Composting is the process of breaking down waste into a nutrient-rich topsoil. Here are a few tips on how to create your compost pile. Let’s start first with a list of what to or not to include in your compost pile and then we’ll talk about two proven methods for it.

The three basic ingredients:
  • Browns—Includes materials such as dead leaves, branches , twigs
  • Greens—Includes materials such as grass clippings, vegetable waste, fruit scraps, and coffee grounds
  • Water

 

INCLUDE

  • Animal ( cow or horse) manure
  • Cardboard rolls
  • Clean paper
  • Coffee grounds and filters
  • Cotton rags
  • Dryer and vacuum cleaner lint
  • Eggshells
  • Fireplace ashes
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Grass clippings
  • Hair and fur
  • Hay and straw
  • Houseplants
  • Leaves
  • Nut shells
  • Sawdust
  • Shredded newspaper
  • Tea bags
  • Wood chips
  • Wool rags
  • Yard trimmings

 

DO NOT INCLUDE

  • Black walnut tree leaves or twigs – Releases substances that might be harmful to plants
  • Coal or charcoal ash – Might contain substances harmful to plants
  • Dairy products (e.g., butter, milk, sour cream, yogurt) and eggs – Creates odor problems and attract pests such as rodents and flies
  • Diseased or insect-ridden plants – Diseases or insects might survive and be transferred back to other plants
  • Fats, grease, lard, or oils – Creates odor problems and attract pests such as rodents and flies
  • Meat or fish bones and scraps – Creates odor problems and attract pests such as rodents and flies
  • Pet wastes (e.g., dog or cat feces, soiled cat litter) – Might contain parasites, bacteria, germs, pathogens, and viruses harmful to humans
  • Yard trimmings treated with chemical pesticides – Might kill beneficial composting organisms

 

Composting Approach One (Backyard)
  1. Select a dry, shady spot near a water source for your compost pile or bin.
  2. Add your brown and green materials as you collect them, making sure larger pieces are chopped or shredded.
  3. Moisten dry materials as they are added.
  4. Once your compost pile is established, mix grass clippings and green waste into the pile and bury fruit and vegetable waste under 10 inches of compost material.
  5. Optional: Cover top of compost with a tarp to keep it moist.
  6. When the material at the bottom is dark and rich in color, your compost is ready to use (this is usually occurs in two months to two years).

 

Composting Approach Two (Backyard)
  1. Select a dry, shady spot near a water source for your compost pile or bin.
  2. Before you add your brown and green materials, make sure larger pieces are chopped or shredded.
  3. Cover your composting area with a 6-inch layer of brown materials.
  4. Add a 3-inch layer of green materials and a little soil or finished compost.
  5. Lightly mix the two layers above.
  6. Top with a 3-inch layer of brown materials, adding water until moist.
  7. Turn your compost pile every week or two with a pitchfork to distribute air and moisture. Move the dry materials from the edges into the middle of the pile. Continue this practice until the pile does not re-heat much after turning.
  8. Your compost will be ready in one to four months, but let the pile sit for two weeks before using.

 

For more information visit:
Recycle Your Yard and Kitchen Waste – Create Your Own Compost Pile
Tagged on:                         

Leave a Reply